Food and Diet for a Healthy Heart

Following a healthy diet

Harvard Healthy Eating Plate For years, research into connections between diet and heart disease focused on individual nutrients like cholesterol (and foods high in dietary cholesterol, like eggs), types of fats, and specific vitamins and minerals. This work has been revealing, but it has also generated some dead ends, along with myths and confusion about what constitutes a heart-healthy diet. That’s because people eat food, not nutrients.

The best diet for preventing heart disease is one that is full of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, fish, poultry, and vegetable oils; includes alcohol in moderation, if at all; and goes easy on red and processed meats, refined carbohydrates, foods and beverages with added sugar, sodium, and foods with trans fat.
People with diets consistent with this dietary pattern had a 31% lower risk of heart disease, a 33% lower risk of diabetes, and a 20% lower risk of stroke. [20]
A randomized controlled trial found that a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts, both rich sources of unsaturated fat, reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events amongst patients with cardiovascular disease over a 4.8-year follow-up period.
This study highlighted that low-fat diets are not beneficial to heart health and that incorporating healthy fats – such as those included in the Mediterranean diet – can improve heart health and weight loss.
There isn’t one exact Mediterranean diet, as this eating style takes into account the different foods, eating patterns, and lifestyles in multiple countries that border the Mediterranean Sea. However, there are similarities that define a Mediterranean eating pattern, including a high intake of olive oil, nuts, vegetables, fruits, and cereals; moderate intake of fish and poultry; low intake of dairy products, red meat, processed meats, and sweets; and wine in moderation, consumed with meals. [21]
A 2020 study focused on dietary scores for 4 healthy eating patterns: Healthy Eating Index–2015; Alternate Mediterranean Diet Score; Healthful Plant-Based Diet Index; and Alternate Healthy Eating Index. Despite different scoring methods, each of these patterns emphasizes a higher intake of whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, and nuts, and lower intakes of red and processed meats and sugar-sweetened beverages.
The study found that those who adhered most to healthy eating patterns had a 14% to 21% lower risk of cardiovascular disease when compared with those who adhered to least. The findings also showed that these different healthy eating patterns were similarly effective at lowering risk across racial and ethnic groups and other subgroups studied and that they were statistically significantly associated with lower risk of both coronary heart disease and stroke. [22]
Sodium and potassium are two interrelated minerals that play major roles in regulating blood pressure and a healthy heart. Eating less salty foods and more potassium-rich foods may significantly lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. [29] Potassium is found in many foods, especially fruits, vegetables, legumes, and low-fat dairy. But the reverse of eating a lot of sodium-rich foods especially processed loaves of bread, packaged snacks, canned goods, and fast-food meals while skimping on potassium can increase cardiovascular disease risk.

if you are already suffering from heart issues or stroke and need restoration without drugs call us on 08023982600

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *